Most violent crimes in Canada

 

Most violent crime in Canada does not involve firearms

Firearms are present in a relatively small proportion of all police-reported violent crime in reporting provinces and territories. Excluding Quebec, police reported approximately 5,600 victims of violent crime where a firearm was present in 2012, a rate of 21 victims for every 100,000 population (Table 1A). In comparison, the rate of victims of non-firearm-related violent crime was about 49 times higher, at 1,033 victims per 100,000 population.

Firearm-related violent crime accounted for 2% of all victims of violent crime in 2012, a proportion that has remained stable over the past four years. For the large majority (81%) of victims of violent crime, there was no weapon present during the commission of the offence.1 A weapon other than a firearm, such as a knife or blunt instrument, was present in 17% of violent offences.

Although violent crime is generally decreasing, the rate of firearm-related violent crime is decreasing at a faster pace than violent crime that does not involve firearms. There were about 1,800 fewer victims of firearm-related violent crime in 2012 than there were in 2009, resulting in a 27% decrease in the rate of firearm-related violent crime (Chart 1).2 Since 2009, the rate of violent offences involving other weapons has decreased 9%, while the rate of offences involving the use of physical force, threat, or no weapon has decreased 14%.

Description for chart 1

Text box 2
Firearm-related violent crime and physical injury

The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey includes two distinct ways of measuring firearm-related violent crime in Canada: most serious weapon present, which is used throughout this Juristat, and weapon causing injury, which is used in this text box.

Most serious weapon present collects information on the most serious weapon present during the commission of the crime, regardless of whether or not the weapon was used. This variable captures incidents where a firearm was used against a victim causing injury, used against a victim without causing injury (i.e., as a threat), or was present during the offence and was not used in any manner. It is not possible to distinguish which of these scenarios occurred.

Weapon causing injury indicates the type of weapon used during the commission of a violent offence if the victim suffered a physical injury as a result of a weapon. While this captures information on the weapon used against victims, it does not include information on weapons used if no injury was suffered (e.g., if a victim was threatened with a weapon but the use did not cause physical injury). If multiple weapons were used to inflict injury, the weapon that was used to cause the most physical injury is recorded. Weapon causing injury does not capture incidents where the firearm was used or fired but missed the victim.

A large majority of injuries that occur as the result of a violent crime are not caused by firearms. In 2012, police reported approximately 134,000 victims of violent crime who suffered at least minor physical injury, accounting for under half (47%) of all victims of violent crime (Table 1B). Of these victims, about 107,600 were injured by the use of physical force, and a further 24,776 were injured by the use of a non-firearm weapon. The remaining 1% of these victims (1,325) were injured due to the use of a firearm.

While a small minority of victims of violent crime are injured due to the use of a firearm, these injuries are typically more serious than those caused by the use of other weapons or physical force. The use of a firearm resulted in major physical injury or death of the victim in 33% of incidents where an injury was suffered, a higher proportion than violent offences involving other weapons (14%) or physical force (4%) (Text box chart 1).

Fewer homicides committed by strangers, more by criminal associates

  • Despite the increased number of victims reported in 2015, increases were not equal across all types of homicides when considering relationship types. Relationship information is available for solved homicides for which an accused has been identified. Decades of relationship information indicates that homicides are frequently committed by someone known to the victim.Note11 In 2015, 87% of victims knew the accused involved in their death (Table 7). This proportion increased from 2014 where a reported 82% of victims knew the accused.Note12
  • The number of victims killed by a stranger in 2015 declined to 58, from 73 reported in 2014. As such homicides committed by strangers accounted for 13% of homicides in 2015 compared to 18% the year before (Table 7). In comparison, police reported an increase in the number of homicides committed by a person with whom the victim had a criminal relationship (54 in 2015 compared to 29 in 2014).
  • Increases were also reported in the number of homicides committed by family members other than current or ex-spouses or common law partners. These homicides increased from 73 to 99 in 2015. This was largely due to an increase in homicides committed by extended family members (Table 7).
  • There were 83 intimate partner homicides reported in Canada in 2015, 3 less than in 2014 (Table 7). The rate of intimate partner homicides remained relatively stable in 2015 at 0.28 per 100,000 population aged 15 and older, which followed a reported increase in the previous year. The rate of female intimate partner homicide remained unchanged from 2014 (0.46 per 100,000 population for both years); while that for males decrease slightly from 0.11 in the previous year to 0.09 in 2015.

Majority of homicide victims and accused persons were male

  • Overall, males account for the majority of both homicide victims and accused persons. In 2015, 71% of homicide victims and 88% of homicide accused were male, findings that have remained consistent over the past 10 years.
  • Rates of homicide among male victims were highest for those 25 to 34 years of age (4.38 per 100,000 population), followed by 18 to 24 year olds (4.29). For females, the highest homicide rate was reported for those aged 18 to 24 years (1.46), followed closely by females aged 25 to 34 years (1.41) (see CANSIM table 253-0003).
  • The rate of accused persons amongst the male population in 2015 was highest for those 18 to 24 years of age (8.80 per 100,000 population). Among females, the rate of being accused of homicide in 2015 was highest for those aged 25 to 34 years (0.89).

Increase in number and rate of youth accused of homicide from previous year

  • In 2015, youth aged 12 to 17 accounted for 7% of the 525 accused persons reported in that year. This is consistent with findings reported over the past 4 years, where the proportion of youth accused has accounted for less than 10% of the total accused persons (see CANSIM table 253-0003).
  • The rate of youth accused of homicide increased, however, by 22% from the previous year. Police reported in 2015 that there were 1.51 youth accused of homicide for every 100,000 youth aged 12 to 17 in Canada, compared with a rate of 1.24 in 2014. Overall, there were 35 youth accused of homicide in 2015, 6 more than the previous year.
  • Youth accused of homicide in 2015 were two times more likely to be involved in a gang-related incident compared to adults (20% of youth accused compared to 10% of adults accused).Note13

 

Firearm-related homicides increase in 2012

Homicides account for very few violent crimes in Canada (Perreault 2013), yet are often used as a barometer for the level of violence within a society (United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime 2011). There were 172 homicides committed with a firearm in 2012, 14 more than the previous year (Table 3). Consistent with previous years, shootings, along with stabbings, were the most common methods used to commit homicide in 2012, accounting for 33% and 31% of all homicides, respectively. Beating (21%) was the next most frequent cause of death.

After reaching its lowest rate since 1971 in 2011, the rate of firearm-related homicide increased 8% to 0.49 per 100,000 population in 2012. Similar to the overall homicide rate (Boyce and Cotter 2013), the rate of firearm-related homicide peaked in 1975 (1.26 per 100,000 population), and then began to decrease. Following an increase in the early 1990s, the firearm-related homicide rate has generally been declining (Chart 3)

 

Most firearm-related homicides involve handguns

Handguns are the most frequently used firearm in the commission of homicide. Handguns were used in the majority (62%) of firearm-related homicides in 2012, followed by rifles or shotguns (23%). Prior to 1991, firearm-related homicides were most frequently committed with a rifle or shotgun.

In the early 1990s, the rate of homicides committed with a handgun surpassed that of homicides committed with a rifle or shotgun for the first time. Since 1995, handguns have accounted for the majority of firearm-related homicides (Chart 5).

Firearm homicides more likely to be gang-related

Firearm-related homicides are more likely to be related to organized crime or street gang activity than homicides committed without the use of a firearm.8 Over the past two decades, the rate of gang-related homicide committed with a firearm has been consistently higher than the rate of gang-related homicide committed with another weapon (Chart 6).

Description for chart 6

In 2012, about half (46%) of all homicides committed with a firearm were gang-related, compared to fewer than one in ten homicides committed with another type of weapon or with physical force (8% and 5%, respectively). Three-quarters (75%) of gang-related homicides involving firearms were committed with the use of a handgun, with fully automatic firearms (10%) the next most frequently used type of firearm in gang-related homicides.

 

Firearm-related robbery continues to decline

Similar to the long-term trend in the firearm-related homicide rate, the rate of firearm-related robbery has also been decreasing.9 In 2012, there were 10 firearm-related robberies per 100,000 population, a decrease of 55% from 1998 (Chart 7).10 This decrease in firearm-related robbery has driven the overall decrease in the rate of robbery, which was 27% lower in 2012 than in 1998. Robbery which involved the use of some other type of weapon was at a rate 36% lower in 2012 than in 1998, whereas the rate of robbery that did not involve a weapon peaked in 2006, but was 8% lower in 2012 than it was in 1998.

Description for chart 7

Firearm-related robbery has also declined as a proportion of all robberies. In 2012, about one in ten (13%) robberies were firearm-related, compared to one in three (33%) in 1982.

Saskatchewan and Manitoba report highest rates of firearm-related violent crime

Firearm-related violent crime varies across the provinces and territories. Among the reporting provinces, consistent with trends in crime in general (Perreault 2013), rates of firearm-related violent crime were highest in Saskatchewan (34 per 100,000 population) and Manitoba (32 per 100,000) (Table 4, Chart 8). Saskatchewan and Manitoba also reported the highest rates of non-firearm-related violent crime among reporting provinces in 2012 (1,879 and 1,667 per 100,000 population, respectively). In contrast, rates of firearm-related violent crime were lowest in Prince Edward Island (11 per 100,000) and Newfoundland and Labrador (15 per 100,000).

Description for chart 8

Rates of violent crime are generally higher in the territories than in the provinces (Perreault 2013). Nunavut (154 per 100,000 population) and the Northwest Territories (39 per 100,000) had firearm-related violent crime rates that were higher than any reporting province. Yukon (17 per 100,000), on the other hand, had a firearm-related violent crime rate that was lower than all but three reporting provinces: Ontario, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Prince Edward Island. All three territories reported non-firearm-related violent crime rates higher than any province.

Handguns are the most frequently present type of firearm in violent crime, and the rate and proportion of their presence differs across the provinces. Looking at the use of handguns specifically, the highest rate among reporting provinces was found in Nova Scotia (16 per 100,000 population), followed by British Columbia (15 per 100,000) (data not shown). Saskatchewan (9 per 100,000) and Manitoba (11 per 100,000), in contrast, recorded rates of handgun-related violent crime that were below the national average (12 per 100,000). While Ontario’s rate of handgun-related violent crime was virtually equal to the rate of all reporting provinces and territories, about two-thirds (68%) of firearm-related violent crime involved handguns, the highest such proportion among the provinces and territories (Table 5).

While Saskatchewan and Manitoba ranked highest among provinces in terms of firearm-related violent crime, they did not have the highest provincial rates of firearm-related homicides. In 2012, Nova Scotia (0.84 per 100,000 population) and Alberta (0.75 per 100,000) recorded the highest rates of firearm-related homicide among the provinces. While both Nova Scotia and Alberta had one more firearm-related homicide than the previous year, much of the overall increase in firearm-related homicides was driven by an increase in Ontario (+11). For the first time since 2006, there were no firearm-related homicides in any of the territories. In addition, there were no firearm-related homicides in Prince Edward Island for the 23rd consecutive year.

 

Increase in number and rate of youth accused of homicide from previous year

  • In 2015, youth aged 12 to 17 accounted for 7% of the 525 accused persons reported in that year. This is consistent with findings reported over the past 4 years, where the proportion of youth accused has accounted for less than 10% of the total accused persons (see CANSIM table 253-0003).
  • The rate of youth accused of homicide increased, however, by 22% from the previous year. Police reported in 2015 that there were 1.51 youth accused of homicide for every 100,000 youth aged 12 to 17 in Canada, compared with a rate of 1.24 in 2014. Overall, there were 35 youth accused of homicide in 2015, 6 more than the previous year.
  • Youth accused of homicide in 2015 were two times more likely to be involved in a gang-related incident compared to adults (20% of youth accused compared to 10% of adults accused).Note13

 

 

Data taken from government website:
https://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2016001/article/14668-eng.htm

https://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2014001/article/11925-eng.htm#a3

 

Opiodis killed 2861 people in the year 2016 and 1460 from January 2017 to June 2017; gun related deaths are 250 ish per year; but the Liberals always include police shootings so that you have a higher number to help their deception for gun crimes and the need for gun control when there is no need for it, as criminals don't obey the law to begin with. Its what makes them criminals after all.

Liberals lie and deceive people for their own social and/or financial gain. It is of no wonder that they cater to the criminals as the Liberals are the same breed. It is evident in the gas plant hearing, as the Liberals do not answer a single question. Any other human being in that situation and/or in a court room would be held for contempt of court.

The Liberals spend money like children. Ontario currently pays $1 billion in interest. That is $1,000,000,000 per month. They raise prices of homes and land so they could benefit from more taxes to be collected; or just flat out sell it under neath your nose to Spain perhaps. The Liberals are such paranoid freaks, its no wonder they want gun control. Hitler did the same to the Jewish people prior to the beginning of WW2. And our Liberals on top of that, tax a tax "...hey, why not guys? What could possibly go wrong; we got this! ….more revenue" and that is insane. They truly are way out in the left field. Ontario’s hydro; another Liberal mess. We pay alot for electricity. CEO makes $4 million a year so its of no wonder, as the money has to come from some where. Let not forget the other 10,000 hydro workers that make over $100,000/yr. yet, the Ontario hydro PAYS the south $70 million, that is $70,000,000 to take our surplus electricity. The Liberals are also raising corporate tax which will drive even more business out of the province. Where is this Cisco plant that was supposed to open in Ontario to add jobs? …..no where cause the company could not afford to operate here in Ontario.

The Liberals also have a news media, the CBC, which is funded by the Liberals, our tax dollars. This media is controlled and directed by the Liberal party. What the CBC won’t tell you is that our neighbouring Americans are overwhelmed with the amount of Canadian business applications as most have had enough with Canada and its financial burden on private business to say the least.

Bottom line is, the Liberals are running a bureaucratic dictatorship; otherwise, there wouldn’t exist a so called ‘whipped vote’ within the parliament; which essentially means that the MP’s have to vote with the party and not what their citizens in their own riding want. Sad!!!  Liberals are a bunch of paranoid freaks that want absolute control. Remember, absolute power corrupts absolutely and the Liberals are well on their way.